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Coping with Crime

Journaling

Journaling is a tool that allows you to process your thoughts and emotions, which helps promote positive thinking and self-talk.

Journaling is a powerful tool that can promote mental health benefits. Writing out your thoughts will give you clarity and focus that enables you to problem-solve.  You will notice a reduction in stress because you can healthily process your thoughts and emotions.

Journaling can help you improve your mental health by:

  • Prioritising your fears, problems, and concerns
  • Giving clarity
  • Reducing mental clutter which gives space and time to focus
  • Allowing you to detach and let go of the past
  • Creating positive self-dialogue with yourself
  • Providing insight into your thought patterns and behaviours

Looking after yourself

Sleep

Everyone needs sleep, but many of us have problems with it, especially after a crime has happened.  You might:

  • Find it hard to fall asleep, stay asleep or you might wake up earlier than you’d like to
  • Have problems that disturb your sleep, such as panic attacks, flashbacks or nightmares
  • Find it hard to wake up or get out of bed
  • Sleep a lot – which could include sleeping at times when you want, or need, to be awake.
Some helpful tips to improve sleeping are:
  • Have a set bedtime- Going to bed and waking up at the same time can improve a sleep routine
  • Relax before bed- Listen to relaxing music, have a bath, practice breathing exercises, meditation
  • Think about screen time- Cut down on screen time before you try to sleep, avoid stimulating activities, such as playing games, use night mode or dark mode on your device, and put your device on aeroplane mode when going to sleep

Exercise

Being physically active means sitting down less and moving our bodies more.  Many people find that physical activity helps them maintain positive mental health, either on its own or in combination with other treatments.  This doesn’t have to mean running marathons or training every day at the gym, it could be including more activity in your day to day routine:

  • Chair exercises
  • Playing an active game
  • Doing household chores
  • Dancing
  • Walking groups
  • Swimming

Hobbies

Hobbies bring a sense of fun and freedom to life that can help to minimise the impact of stress and anxiety. Those who feel overwhelmed can benefit from hobbies because they provide an outlet for stress and something to look forward to.

Hobbies can include:

  • Gardening
  • Music and podcasts
  • Reading
  • Painting
  • Joining local groups- befriending services, walking clubs, fishing groups etc
  • Volunteering in your local community
  • Colouring
  • Photography

Useful links for wellbeing

MIND www.mind.org.uk

SAMARTIANS www.samaritans.org

NHS www.nhs.uk/mental-health

Silverline www.thesilverline.org.uk

CALM www.thecalmzone.net

GIVE US A SHOUT www.giveusashout.org

Men’s Minds Matter www.mensmindsmatter.org

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